Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Spoiler discussion of movies.

Moderators: Moderators, Moderators, Moderators, Moderators

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Wed Nov 09, 2011 1:36 am

New TV Spot!
http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=84100

I don't think I saw anything new...
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female


Ads are removed for registered users






Ads are removed for registered users

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Thu Nov 24, 2011 3:43 pm

Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Fri Dec 02, 2011 2:52 pm

Interview with Screenwriters Josh Appelbaum and Andre Nemec!
In the initial stages of "Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol," screenwriters Josh Appelbaum and Andre Nemec huddled with star Tom Cruise, director Brad Bird and producer J.J. Abrams hashing over the broad story points.
"It was a communal process," says Appelbaum. "But when it gets down to me and Andre …"

"We spend a lot of time in room alone, laying it all out, beat for beat," continues Nemec.

"Because if we don't have that really detailed roadmap before starting the script, it can be mayhem," adds Appelbaum.

It's not surprising to hear Appelbaum and Nemec complete each other's sentences. They're not just longtime professional partners -- they've been friends since they were third-graders at Riverdale Country School, a K-12 preparatory academy in New York .



The duo went their separate ways for college, with Appelbaum attending NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, while Nemec went to USC. Reconvening in Los Angeles after graduation, they wrote a TV pilot they were certain would put them on the show business map. Nemec, who had guested on several series, would star; Appelbaum would direct.

"We had huge and ridiculous aspirations for it," Appelbaum says. But the script got them an agent they began working soon after that as staff writers on the first-run syndicated series "Fame L.A." (1997).

Over the next several years, they bounced to the staff of a new show each season -- "Early Edition," "Martial Law," "Profiler," "Going to California," "She Spies" and "Fastlane" -- before landing on the Abrams-produced spy show "Alias" for three seasons. Finally, in 2007, they got their own show, "October Road," which lasted two seasons, and they went on to create the U.S. version of "Life on Mars" (2008-09) and "Happy Town" (2010).

Since completing the latest "Mission: Impossible," the duo has been tapped to rewrite "Now You See Me" for Summit, script a reboot of "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" for Paramount and producer Michael Bay, and a pen an untitled New York City-set disaster film for producer Mark Gordon.

"After that, our dance card is a little open," Nemec says.

"But we're definitely talking to J.J. about doing something in the near future," Appelbaum adds.
http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118046656


Tom Cruise and Paula Patton Promote MI:4 In Tokyo
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/entertainment/2011-12/02/content_14202054.htm


Jeremy Renner Talks Ghost Protocol and MORE!

"Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol" wont be in theaters until December 21st and Jeremy Renner isn't too worried about it. Recently at a press junket I interviewed Jeremy in regards to his new role in this million dollar franchise. Jeremy plays agent William Brandt, a desk jockey with little field experience, or so we think who squares off with Ethan through the course of the film. At least that's the impression we get from the trailer. Instead of screening the film for the press we were treated to six scenes, approximately 30 minutes of the film in IMAX, which was impressive. When it comes to story line, well I'm pretty much in the dark too. Although the IMAX scenes were incredible and well executed, it's almost the only way to see this film.

I spoke to Jeremy about entering this franchise, doing stunt work, how life has changes since "The Hurt Locker", and about his upcoming projects "The Avengers" and "The Bourne Legacy", check it out.

Since your character is sort of the new team member who thinks all of this IMF stuff is kind of crazy is that a fun position to be in, to always be getting in Ethan Hunt’s face and have everything explained?

JEREMY RENNER: Well, I mean, it was fun to play the character. It is a slightly different approach, because I had no more information than you do at this point. You saw 20 minutes or so, right? It was a gray, sort of complex character to jump into and nothing is as it seems in a spy movie and this certainly delivers that.


Is that more the appeal, the opportunity to do something duplicitous, that you could go either way?

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah. I mean, I’m attracted to those kind of roles, that you could be good or you could be bad, and you just don’t know. I guess I just have one of those arresting faces that look like I want to beat you up or something. I don’t know if [LAUGHTER] or whatever it is, but yeah, I mean, I like those parts.

Is it comforting to sort of walk into a franchise that has an established lead? Does that give you an advantage, or is there a challenge in sort of distinguishing yourself when he’s leading the charge?

JEREMY RENNER: No I think it’s great to be part of a franchise that is successful, because there's been a continuation of the people who see it. That’s kind of nice to be a part of a world stage, a movie gets all around the world and you know that, because 80% of the movies I’ve done, nobody’s seen. So going into that’s pretty exciting. And getting the opportunity to work with Tom is really exciting.

Given the fact that each of these films is kind of independent of one another and you have a new director with Brad Bird, did you guys feel like you had to take a crash course in what these movies are what’s involved in these movies? Or were you guys sort of creating from the ground up, your own thing?

JEREMY RENNER: You know I was a fan of the franchise to begin with. And so I was very aware of everything and then re-watching it all again was informative and now I’m part of it. But you know, like you said they’re all very separate movies. Tom never wanted to do a franchise or to do a sequel to any movie, and he hasn’t, except for “Mission”, which is his baby. He’s always had directors come on that had a very specific sort of vision for it that keep them kind of separate, as movies on their own, stand-alone movies, that if you didn’t see the first two the third one still makes sense and the only through line is Tom’s character for the most part. There’s been characters that have trickled in and out, but with this one having Brad come in and have his sort of slant with the gadgets and the attention to detail and character, which brings tension and cutting tension with comedy; and you have Simon Pegg there for that which is awesome. Brad Bird is all over this movie and if you’ve seen “The Incredibles” or any of those movies you definitely see that in this.

We just saw a part of the movie but we want to know what will happen with your character?

JEREMY RENNER: [LAUGHTER] Well I can’t that’s giving away the movie. I’m not going to tell you if I live or die, if I’m good or bad. It might create more questions than answers for you. But that’s what the character is you know, it’s one of those hinge/fringe characters you’re not sure what’s gonna happen and that was the attraction for me. I can tell you that Will Brandt is a Chief Analyst for the IMF, the right hand man to the Secretary, which is always the voice, now a face finally in this movie played by Tom Wilkinson. He hands out all the missions. I'm a sort of buttoned up, sort of desk jockey that gets thrown into the mix of Ethan Hunt and two other agents, Paula Patton’s and Simon Pegg’s characters. And instead of having a mission dished out it and because of circumstances we’re thrown together and have to be together. It doesn’t mean we like each other, but we have to unite and to overcome certain obstacles. Then within that spectacle of action and mission stuff there’s an interesting character. You will see all four characters are very strong archetypes and how they play off each other is Brad Bird’s strong suit.



Tom is known for his enthusiasm and for doing his own stunts. Are you that way, as well?

JEREMY RENNER: Umm, I don’t know, I mean, yes I’m enthusiastic about it. If it’s required of me to do it, i'll do it, I’m attracted to challenges. There’s a great physical challenge in doing stunts. Also, there’s no ticket you can buy for that ride, people don’t get that opportunity. So yeah, that’s exciting and if it serves the story and the character. I don’t want to just do a stunt just to do a stunt or to have fun, it just becomes sort of icing on the cake to help tell the story.

Even though you don’t get to be the guy out on the building ?

JEREMY RENNER: And happily. [LAUGHTER]

Definitely what’s it’s like to be up there in that room looking out the window and just be involved in that sequence?

JEREMY RENNER: It’s one of those things, if you get hit by a bus and you didn’t know it that’s one thing but if you see the bus coming and you get paralyzed and you can’t move, you just watch it come at you. Tom is out there running around doing his thing all over the building and we’re just standing there sort of by the edge and that is more terrifying. Once I hung out for 30 seconds and I near vomited, but then once that went away Tom was laughing and hanging upside down all red faced and he’s like, “Look at this view!” I’m like, “What are you talking about. I’m gonna vomit on you.” But once that went away he was right. It was like, “This is beautiful.” I mean it was fantastic.

How much physical stuff and training did you have to do?

JEREMY RENNER: I had a long curve to get ahead. After “The Town” I didn’t do anything physical; I didn’t break a sweat for a year until “Mission”. I had to make up for lost time and spend like five hours a day learning certain disciplines, like Moi Tai and Filipino stick fighting and all this sort of random stuff that I never thought I’d learn, which a blast. Then there’s stuff on a wire, you have to sort of prepare your body for, certain pick points and trigger points in your body. I know much more about my body than I ever wanted to.

Has this film kind of prepped you for the Bourne film?

JEREMY RENNER: Oh yeah, all of them, Tom has prepared me especially for “Bourne”, but all my future films, “Hansel and Gretel” and then “The Avengers” and now “Bourne”, for the sort of mental place to be, to know when you’re doing an action sequence. In any professional sport, in America at least, if you get injured or you hurt your knee or whatever second string comes in but it doesn’t happen on movies. So you can’t get injured. It’s sort of getting on this really great program to not be in shape, but to just prevent injuries. Tom introduced me to some really great physiotherapists and that sort of thing, to prepare my body for that sort of torture.



Was getting involved in three different franchises part of the plan?

JEREMY RENNER: I don’t know whose plan; maybe but not my plan. [LAUGHTER] But it just sort of happened to come that way.

And how do you deal with expectations when one, you have a comic book character who maybe everyone knows and now that you have a series that people know, but a new character they’re inventing for it?

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah, I don’t do well with expectation in my life or I certainly can’t think about it in other peoples’ lives. All I can do is do the best I can do, and I’m consciously aware, like specifically in the comic book world where there’s a built-in fan base to that. But there’s a little bit of leniency because there’s a couple different universes. There’s the Ultimates and then there’s the old school version. I wasn’t interested in wearing purple tights when I’m 50 so I love that they went the ultimates route. I wanted to serve the story and the script at hand that Josh Whedon wrote and not bring a bunch of baggage.

How is your life right now? Do you feel it’s different?

JEREMY RENNER: Umm, well, I’m not different, but a lot of things around me have shifted. Some in pretty, pretty great ways. Artistically, there’s a lot more opportunities; bigger opportunities, bigger meaning big directors that, you know, you love; or the quality of scripts the amount of scripts that sort of thing. And people just being aware of who you are all of a sudden. People that you think you know, like for instance some big movie star who all of a sudden says your name. That’s strange but really great.

Is continuing to do more independent projects something that’s important for you going forward in your career? I mean now that you know you’re a much bigger star and you’re attached to all these franchises.

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah, absolutely. I’ll never, never abandon completely the stage where I started, I'm actually trying to do that next year. I’ll see if I can manifest the energy to go and do that. It takes a lot out of you to do a stage play but I’d love to do that. I’d love to continue to do challenging material, I mean whatever shape or form that comes in. I want to not do anything I’ve done before. Now it’s action movies at this point but where it is after that, it has to have certain requirements for me to want to get up every morning and be happy to go to work, then I don’t care the size of the movie I just care about who I get to learn from.

Talking about your new projects you are filming “The Bourne Legacy”?

JEREMY RENNER: “Bourne Legacy”, I’m currently shooting, yes.



Could you share with us something about the project?

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah but I’m going to have to kill you because we’re in the middle of shooting it you know, I can’t say a whole lot about it. But what I can clarify that there’s been some confusion about, that I was taking over for Matt and there’s no taking over for Matt. Matt Damon will always be Jason Bourne to that franchise. But the writer is consistent through them all, the same writer, and he’s also our director on this one. For the fan base that likes that type of movie, it’ll be the continuity of that, the pace of it, the way it’s shot, just everything about it is a “Bourne” movie. There’s just going to be different faces. There’s going to be Ed Norton and Rachel Weiss which are some of the most talented actors out there. But it’ll be just a different program and different spies but I’ll have that same sort of pace to it.

Have you spoken to Matt?

JEREMY RENNER: Oh, yeah.

And advice did he give you?

JEREMY RENNER: He’s such a coo, grounded guy. If anything, he said “Just listen to your guys that know what they’re doing.” He’s worked with Dan Bradley who did all the action on all the “Bourne” movies. He’s actually our Second Unit Director on “Mission”. So I was happy to know that he was part of this “Bourne” movie. If you’re doing action you’re working with Dan Bradley. He said " just trust that guy.” I’m like, “Oh, yeah, perfect. You don’t have to tell me. I’ve already worked with him. He’s awesome.” So yeah, because he’s going to ask you to do some really terrifying things and you can just trust that it’s all right.

Are you are filming here in L.A.?

JEREMY RENNER: Oh, wow, no, I haven’t filmed in L.A. in geez since 2002. No we’re in New York, we just finished; we go to Calgary, and then we go to the Philippines.

And how long does the shoot go?

JEREMY RENNER: Until the end of February.

You were talking about sort of taking on different kinds of challenges. You’ve been talking about doing a James Gray project.

JEREMY RENNER: That actually is a great opportunity. I mean it’s an amazing story. But it’s James Gray man, and it’s Marion Cotillard and Joaquin Phoenix. I mean, again, some of the best talent out there. It’s not an action movie which is kind of at this point a nice thing; I can actually take a break on my body and just focus on just work and the character. It's refreshing to work with that caliber of talent and really exciting, it’s a small role. It’s something we can shoot in a very short amount of time. There’s a pimp and a whore and a magician and I get to play the magician in a really cool early 1900’s immigration movie Ellis Island.

Do you have to be careful about the kinds of roles you take on?

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah.

After playing in “The Hurt Locker” and “The Town”

JEREMY RENNER: I think that’s where real life and cinema kind of blend for me. I like to play unpredictable characters, and I like to be unpredictable in what movie I’ll do. I don’t want to repeat anything and what the future holds, I don’t know. But that’s what I like, I’ll take any risks there is so I’m not concerned about what people think or what they want. What matters to me is learning and growing and getting to skip to work and do what I love to do. As long as I can do that, I’m happy.

Marvel has afforded a somewhat unique opportunity where you got to set up a character in someone else’s movie for a brief scene, and then really establish your own character. Is that a unique opportunity for an actor?

JEREMY RENNER: Umm, yeah, but it’s actually difficult because there’s not a lot to do, like say in “Thor” you just stand in a bucket and hold my bow and arrow. Well what’s the character? I have no idea. I was thrown into that very quickly . So it’s a little strange. I don’t know if it’s a good thing. I mean, I don’t think I’d go about it normally that way, but it was certainly a different way to kind of go about taking on a role.

Would you like to do a separate Hawkeye movie to explore the character deeper?

JEREMY RENNER: I don’t know there are a lot of variables in that one as if they’d want to make one what it would be about. There’s a lot of things, I suppose if they all aligned then it could be interesting because I certainly like the character. But I don’t know what the future holds.



Do you get the feel of an ensemble movie from “The Avengers” ?

JEREMY RENNER: Oh, yeah.

I know it’s a huge.

JEREMY RENNER: Huge, I mean look at how many characters are in that thing. It was the ultimate challenge for Josh Whedon, who knows that universe so well no one better to write it. And he was so challenged to write and direct that thing. I don’t know how you put that many characters in a movie like that. It’s immense but you know, with that you have to sort of pass the baton. You get to work with very few of them, because everybody’s got their own thing kind of going on; someone’s in the air flying around; I’m on the ground shooting a bow and arrow and whatever there’s a lot of things happening. So I have no idea what that movie looks like. Most of the time I have a good idea of how it’s going to turn out because I’ve seen so much of it but this time I have no idea. I feel like I might be an extra in it; I’m not sure.

And how do you feel, being one of the Avengers?

JEREMY RENNER: You know it’s great, it’s an amazing cast and I wish I got to do more with them. But I had fun with the people I did get to work with.

Are you’re sort of involved in developing a Steve McQueen film?

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah involved in developing it. It happened because a script came around and they asked maybe if I wanted to look at it and potentially maybe play him. I thought, “Ah, it’s interesting.” And you know, obviously I loved his movies. I’ve seen probably like three of his movies. But then as it came around and I started to study him more and realized wow, what a dichotomy of a human being. He’s really, really interesting, outside of what most of us know him as. But he was also the most insecure guy that ever lived, that was really interesting to me. The script I felt was just sort of a retelling of what everybody already knows about him. I didn’t know a lot about him, but it’s retelling the things I knew about him. So I thought, that’s really kind of boring and didn’t do him justice. So that’s why we’re developing this thing from these images that I saw. For instance there’s a photo of him and a butcher in the shop and he's bandaging up his hand and the movie set’s around the corner. He’s just preparing to do a stunt, or just did the stunt of the famous bike jump or whatever the heck it was. Everybody knows about that stunt so why talk about that? I want to know what that conversation was between that butcher and McQueen in that butcher shop. That’s more interesting to me and I think an inside sort of look into his life as a human being could be fascinating. So that’s what we’re exploring. James Gray is actually the one writing that.

So it would be more of a personal look at him than say a careerist view?

JEREMY RENNER: Yeah. I mean, you can’t avoid that, but I’d rather have that be the backdrop of his life, and to see what is it to walk into a room and everybody stares at you because they know exactly who you are. Not a lot of people know what that feels like. So let’s let people into that world. I think that’s interesting.

Is that still a daunting role to take on?

JEREMY RENNER: I don’t know. I haven’t seen the script. I’m already imaging it to be almost impossible, but you know I’d love to take on the challenge. It’d be an honor.http://www.latinoreview.com/news/talkin ... nner-15507


New Clip with Paula Patton fighting Lea Seydoux! (This scene is SO Alias!)
http://www.ign.com/videos/2011/11/30/mission-impossible-ghost-protocol-babe-battle



Thought I would add some of those great Alias fight sequences just to show you what I mean

Sydney and Allison Dorin (Project Helix - Fake Francie)


Sydney and Lauren Reed


Sydney with Noah Hicks (go to 5:23 mark)


A Montage of Fight Scenes!
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Sun Dec 04, 2011 5:06 pm

Just adding more speculation. As I tend to notice riffs, parallels, and easter eggs between Bad Robot works, I just wanted to point out that Person of Interest series regular Taraji P. Henson, whom plays Detective Carter, may be someone to think about while seeing Ghost Protocol!

Paula Patton's character in MI:GP is named Jane Carter! ---Interestingly POI has taken a two week break, but is scheduled to return December 8th. The episode title is
Spoiler (Click to reveal/hide)
"Get Carter"


Note: Because of the Nolan influence, POI characters can be paralleled to "Batman's". Detective Carter is in a role VERY similar to Commissioner Gordan. "

It could be since this POI episode is the first to really feature Carter, may also then tie into Patton's character, or situation in Ghost Protocol, --especially also since only 8 days later MI:GP will be relaesed in IMAX with "the Dark Knight Rises" small preview/sneak peek/"prologue" attached!
Last edited by DarthLocke on Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:40 pm

Brad Bird Interview with MovieWeb:
http://www.movieweb.com/news/exclusive-brad-bird-talks-mission-impossible-ghost-protocol

There's some additional footage to some sequences we have seen in TV spots and the Trailers, but also it is revealed that the bomb was set off by the Russians unofficially declaring war...
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby Dreyesbo on Tue Dec 06, 2011 2:16 am

Darth, by any chance do you know how much of the film was shot in IMAX? I'm wondering if I should go see it that way.
"There's something you better understand about me because it's important. And one day your life may depend on it...I am definitely a mad man with a box."

Image


Image
User avatar
Dreyesbo
Senior Moderator
 
Posts: 3693
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:21 pm
Location: Monterrey, Mexico
Gender: Male

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Tue Dec 06, 2011 2:47 am

Dreyesbo wrote:Darth, by any chance do you know how much of the film was shot in IMAX? I'm wondering if I should go see it that way.



I know at least the Dubai scenes are...

Just went to check IMAX...it says,

"Mission: Impossible- Ghost Protocol The IMAX Experience will feature select footage shot with IMAX cameras. The IMAX release will be digitally re-mastered into the image and sound quality of The IMAX Experience with proprietary IMAX DMR (Digital Re-mastering) technology. The crystal-clear images coupled with IMAX’s customized theatre geometry and powerful digital audio create a unique environment that will make you feel as if you are in the movie."

More:http://www.imax.com/movies/m/mission-impossible-ghost-protocol-the-imax-experience/

I am too far away from an IMAX to even get the chance, but if I could I would just for the Dubai scene alone.

If I find any more specific information and/or other IMAX shot scene info, I will come back and post it. :)


------------------
I don't have definitive proof, but rumor has it @ 30 mins of footage. The run time is 132 mins., so if this rumor is correct, then only about a quarter of the film is shot that way.
Last edited by DarthLocke on Tue Dec 06, 2011 2:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby Dreyesbo on Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:15 am

Thanks :D 30 minutes is great, then! I saw The Dark Knight in an IMAX screen, and it was at max 7-10 min. The Dubai scene should be breathtaking then. Thanks again!
"There's something you better understand about me because it's important. And one day your life may depend on it...I am definitely a mad man with a box."

Image


Image
User avatar
Dreyesbo
Senior Moderator
 
Posts: 3693
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:21 pm
Location: Monterrey, Mexico
Gender: Male

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Wed Dec 07, 2011 2:43 am

^I am still on the look out for more official info...

Character Posters! (Including a Russian Character!) But no Josh Holloway :cursing: :cursing:
http://www.filmofilia.com/impossible-ghost-protocol-character-posters-77345/
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Wed Dec 07, 2011 7:24 pm

MTV Covers MI:GP Premiere at "Dubai International Film Festival" Today and Tonight!
http://moviesblog.mtv.com/2011/12/07/tom-cruise-dubai/

Stayed tuned for reviews and more spoilers.....
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Thu Dec 08, 2011 2:35 pm

First Review!
Mark Adams at the Dubai world premiere of Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol.

He might well be turning 50 next year, but there is no denying Tom Cruise’s action-man credentials.

His death-defying stunts and sheer physical charisma – though who knows how much special effects are involved – are the thrilling highlights of the fourth installment of the Mission: Impossible series.

The film had its world premiere in Dubai last night…which was richly appropriate given that the grandstanding heart-plumping set-piece central scenes of the film take place in Dubai… or rather atop the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa.


Tom Cruise meets the fans
And Tom Cruise was there – along with co-stars Paula Patton and Simon Pegg – to work the red carpet, press the flesh and smile sweetly for the hordes of cameras. He is a professional when it comes to red carpet work – and smiled sweetly as he fulfilled his promotional duties.

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol might well be a romping spy adventure of pretty traditional structure and format, but once Tom slips into his climbing gear (bolstered by some nifty special sticky gloves) and starts shimmying up the sheer glass sides of this spectacular building, the film really goes into overdrive.

And it is made even more spectacular if you catch it in an IMAX version. The Burj Khalifa scenes as seen on the massive IMAX screen are breathtaking…and if you suffer from vertigo it might well give you the shakes.

The film went down pretty well at its black tie world premiere audience at the Dubai Film Festival, and there was wild applause at the action scenes on the Burj Khalifa - and well deserved it was too.

There are some other great moments of action and adventure – the film also shot in Budapest, Moscow and Mumbai – but the Dubai sequences (which also includes a cool chase in the middle of a sandstorm) are the real standouts.

The film sees super-spy Ethan Hunt (Cruise) and his team - tough Jane Carter (Paula Patton), computer nerd Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg) and analyst William Brandt (Jeremy Renner) – disavowed by the government when his team are framed for a bombing at the Kremlin in Moscow.

The team find themselves on a globetrotting mission to track down a brilliant but dangerous madman (Michael Nyqvist) who is planning on launching nuclear weapons to start World War III.

The structure is as familiar one – director Brad Bird (whose background is an animation, and made the 2006 superhero hit The Incredibles - takes a jokey, self-aware stance – and cleverly there is a TV episode-style opening sequence which features mini-clips from the action to come, but the film is delivered with a lot of style and panache.

Read more: http://www.mirror.co.uk/celebs/columnis ... z1fws27zNh


Another Review from Hollywood Reporter! (This one has WAY more plot Spoilers!!!)

It may not be The Incredibles, but there is some fairly incredible stuff to be found in Mission: Impossible —Ghost Protocol, animation ace Brad Bird's first live-action film and a good continuation of the now-16-year-old series. The impact of spectacular action on striking international locales is moderated somewhat by the repetitive nature of the challenges faced by this rebooted team of American agents trying to thwart a villain who believes that a nuclear winter would be in the natural order of things. With Tom Cruise in top form here and IMAX presentation enhancing some of the key sequences, this Paramount release should add substantially to the grand total of a franchise that has hauled in $1.4 billion to date.
OUR EDITOR RECOMMENDS

'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol' Dubai Premiere Red Carpet Arrivals

'Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol' Dubai Premiere Delayed Two Hours, But Worth the Wait

'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol' Full Trailer Debuts (Video)

Why Tom Cruise Still Matters in the Film Industry (Analysis)
PHOTOS: 'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol' Dubai Premiere Red Carpet Arrivals
At least two different constituencies will be curious about this fourth installment of a series which, if not taken to heart by the masses on the level of Bond, Harry Potter or even Indiana Jones, has reliably supplied enough lavish, high-voltage excitement to keep international audiences coming back for more about twice a decade. First will be the mainstream action and Cruise fans, who will get their money's worth from the eye-popping set pieces staged in Moscow, Dubai (with the star dangling from and traversing the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building) and Mumbai, for starters.

Then there are those who will be curious about how Bird, the force behind three superb, unusually smart animated features, Iron Giant, The Incredibles and Ratatouille, fares behind the camera of a big live-action feature. Given the demands of working within a strict and narrowly defined format that encourages imagination but allows for little deviation, he's done a fine job, perhaps nowhere better than in the first protracted set piece. Accomplished with very little dialogue and unexpected humor under the circumstances, it's an escape from a Russian prison by Cruise's Ethan Hunt (first seen throwing a ball against a wall, in likely homage to Steve McQueen in The Great Escape) orchestrated electronically from the outside by the one other holdover from the last film's team, Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg).

Conceived entirely visually, the sequence boasts perfect timing, framing and movement, with some brutal action offset by the inspired musical overlay of Dean Martin singing "Ain't That a Kick in the Head" and the general perspective of not really understanding what's going on, as Ethan and a Russian cohort outmaneuver the authorities and other prisoners to make the break.

Q&A: 'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol 's' Anil Kapoor on Balancing Bollywood and Hollywood
Another tense but, for contrast, quiet scene quickly follows, in which disguised Ethan and Benji must do no less than penetrate the innermost sanctum of the Kremlin to retrieve the file Kurt Hendricks (Michael Nyqvist), who they know is getting very close to being able to trigger a nuclear holocaust that would oblige the world to start over again from scratch. The moment they get out, a huge explosion blows up an entire corner of the edifice. Ethan's boss (an unbilled Tom Wilkinson) shortly informs him that, as the incident will eventually be blamed on the United States, the president has declared “ghost protocol,” meaning that the IMF team, which also includes tough babe Jane Carter (Paula Patton) and will soon add agent William Brandt (Jeremy Renner), is being disowned and hung out to dry.
Which is exactly where Ethan finds himself at his next stop, clinging with suction gloves to the windows 123 floors up on the Burj Khalifa, which, approached from a desert road, is first seen rising like Oz on the horizon. For no doubt excellent reasons, this is the spot where the team hopes to nail Hendricks and, in the bargain, a crafty and sexy assassin (Lea Seydoux) Jane gets to fight hand-to-hand.

Ethan spends quite a bit of time making like Spider-Man on the side of the building and much has been made of how Cruise insisted upon doing this himself. It's riveting, with some shots shortening the breath and likely to induce vertigo in the susceptible. But a question arises: Since CGI has now become so convincing that it's often impossible to know if what's onscreen is real or artificial (as the Kremlin exterior during and after the explosion obviously is), how necessary was it for Cruise to actually get outside more than a thousand feet up? Are there, in fact, some computer-generated images mixed into this fine, thoroughly concocted sequence?
VIDEO: Tom Cruise Defies Gravity in 'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol' Clip

By this time, and as the action moves along to India, the patterns in the script by veteran Alias writers Josh Appelbaum and Andre Nemec become all to familiar, as Ethan sets the objectives and does the lion's share of the heavy lifting, Jane and William do their things and Benji races his fingers over his keyboard and amongst ridiculously complicated wiring systems so as to break into the most impenetrable computer files within seconds. At a lavish Mumbai bash, Jane does get to go glam in order to distract a local gazillionaire (Anil Kapoor, from Slumdog Millionaire), but the main action here is Ethan battling Hendricks for a crucial metal briefcase in a high rise car park, with elevators and cars rising up and down creating an ever-changing set of levels and opportunities.
Mild encroaching signs of physical maturity are becoming to Cruise (he'll turn 50 next year), who's obviously in great shape but doesn't strut and preen at all in this film. He's quite appealing, in fact, without asking to be admired or liked. While continuing to be able to do films like this, he might be on the verge of entering a new phase of his career by taking on some quite different sorts of roles.

VIDEO: 'Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol': New Clip Features Girl Fight Between Paula Patton, Lea Seydoux
As for Renner's character, he starts as a suit-and-tie functionary. But it turns out he and Ethan have a history, one that comes home to roost at the end but doesn't open up as much personal exchange between the two or ultimate meaning as might have been. Renner's potential for danger, intensity and violence, so evident in The Hurt Locker and The Town, goes largely untapped, which is a shame in that there are momentary hints he and Cruise could have cooked with some material tailored to their strengths.

Pegg and Patton are fine as far as they go but just a couple of personal shadings should not have been out of the question even in a film as straight-ahead and streamlined as this. Unquestionably, the film moves like crazy but could have used some variations of rhythm and some different moves in the second half, especially as the Mumbai material is not as impressive or enticing as what went on at points west.

Technically, the film is immaculate, with incredible photographic clarity, at least as presented in IMAX (full top-to-bottom images account for a reported 27 minutes of the running time). Michael Giacchino's active, imaginative, nearly ever-present score nicely incorporates Lalo Schifrin's original TV theme, as the previous films also did.
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review ... iew-271129


HitFix Review From Yesterday:
The "Mission: Impossible" franchise is a strange one.

For one thing, I think people often misuse the word "franchise." Just because they make a few sequels to a movie, that doesn't automatically qualify that thing as a franchise. I think of that more as a description of a film property (or book property or game property… whatever sort of IP you want to substitute) that features a basic idea or premise that can be endlessly refigured to fit new casts, new creative teams, and new storytelling styles, with little real regard for continuity. "Mission: Impossible," from the moment it first aired as a television show, has offered up a near-perfect franchise engine, a premise so simple, so feather-light, that you can do anything with it, and as long as you strike those same few notes, it's recognizably "Mission: Impossible."

Over the weekend, I rewatched the first three "Mission: Impossible" films on Blu-ray. I've always been fond of the first one, and looking at it now, it's one of those early CGI-era movies that reaches for some groundbreaking stuff in how action is staged and shot that doesn't totally work on a technical level, but that deserves respect for pushing the envelope as much as it did. More than that, though, it's a fun piece of pop culture subversion that was designed to acknowledge the old school, then annihilate the old school, then introduce Tom Cruise as the new school. Brian De Palma made each set piece feel like he was having fun, and it was big and complex and sleek and absolutely proved that it would work on the big screen.

The second film is so bad that it feels like someone who was very angry at John Woo decided to make a MAD-magazine-style parody of John Woo films and then release it with his name attached as director. Awful.

The third film was the first that really tried to give a continuity and a weight to Ethan Hunt as the center of the film series. The first two films are "Mission: Impossible" adventures that happen to star Ethan Hunt. The third film was all about Ethan's desire to live a normal life, to leave fieldwork behind, to marry Julia (Michelle Monahan), and to finally just wear one face, his own. There was a real sense of team in the last film, and I liked the chemistry that existed between Ving Rhames, Jonathan Rhys-Meyers and Maggie Q. And, speaking of Q, the third film introduced Benji Dunn, played by Simon Pegg, who played a comic spin on Q, very much the same role that existed on "Alias." I knew as soon as I saw Pegg's two moments that he was going to get bumped up for more if they ever did a sequel. That third film is not about a global threat or terrorist, but instead about karma screwing Ethan Hunt around when he tries to put his bloodstained past behind him, and it worked for one film to focus in at Ethan instead of out at a big spy movie story.

This time out, the threat is full-blown nuclear war, worldwide, so I think it's safe to say the stakes are a little higher here.

I think "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol" is the most consistently entertaining, most laser-focused entry in the series so far, and while I would argue that it is very much a sequel to the third film and not just a disconnected piece of a flexible franchise, it is also a great rollicking self-contained spy movie adventure on a grand scale, and it's preposterous fun.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised. Remember that scene in "The Incredibles" where they're sneaking onto Syndrome's island and taking out henchmen and dealing with the high-tech security? That sequence was like watching the Fantastic Four stepping into a '60s-era James Bond film, and it was apparent that Bird has a real love of the genre and a working knowledge of how to pay perfect tribute to it. Even so, this is his first live-action film, and he's stepping into someone else's thing, working for Tom Cruise and JJ Abrams, so I was nervous that I wouldn't see much of his personality or style in the end result. Instead, this is a pretty clear expression of Bird's voice, and there is an energy to it that feels like a whole new lease on life for the series.


You may be aware that Bird shot some of the film using the IMAX cameras, and one of the reasons I would encourage you to see the film in that format is because of the very sly way Bird uses the transition from the full IMAX frame to a more traditional widescreen frame, blowing it out to the full size for almost all of his major establishing shots moving over the vistas of cities around the world. Here, we start in Budapest, and the way the film pushes in on a rooftop in the city while in constant motion, the full IMAX frame opened to the top and the bottom, it's almost like you can fall into the frame. Right away, we're introduced to a new character in the IMF world, Trevor Hanaway (Josh Holloway), and following a short shocking action sequence with him, we cut to a prison escape that's been engineered by Benji Dunn (Pegg, returning with, as I hoped, a much larger part) and Jane Carter (Paula Patton), and it's not until about halfway into the sequence that you realize who it is that they're breaking out of the prison. Of course, it's Ethan Hunt, and from the moment he turns around to reveal himself to the camera, this is one of the most engaged performances from Cruise in a while. He's got the Movie Star turned up to ten here, and it's a lot of fun to watch. Say what you will about Cruise and his off-screen persona, but none of that matters to me when I'm in a theater. He is still able to push all of that aside and give one of these performances that takes full advantage of the iconic power of Being Tom Cruise.

By the time the opening sequence ends with Tom Cruise saying the line, "Light the fuse," with Michael Giacchino's riff on the beloved original theme, there is such a controlled and confident sense of cool that you know you're in good hands. Brad really knows his spy movie vocabulary, and he pulls off what none of the films have so far: he tells a good spy/action story on a narrative level, and each set piece not only works to escalate the film from one to the next, but they also work as little mini-movies in their own right, which is something he excels at.

The story here all hinges on why they broke Cruise out of prison and why he was in there in the first place. They need him for a new mission, and that new mission sets off a chain of events that may literally end Western civilization, with only Hunt, Dunn, Carter, and an IMF analyst named Brandt (Jeremy Renner) to stop the plans of Russian nuclear specialist Kurt Hendricks (Michael Nyqvist). It's a very direct narrative, one scene propelled into the next by this constant need to catch up with these bad guys, and I like that it's as simple as it is. It allows Bird to focus on building those action scenes and just enjoying the characters, and as a result, it's a pretty great piece of high-energy entertainment.

Everything in Dubai is great. Just amazing. It is one long sequence that incorporates two of the biggest IMAX sequences and some really remarkable stunt work. But I think the Kremlin break-in is great as well. I think the entire extended climax in Mumbai is great. I think the team dynamics are great. Simon Pegg deserved the promotion in this movie, and he makes the most of it. If Jeremy Renner's being groomed for stardom in the last year or so, this is the movie where it really begins. He's great. I know I keep using that word, but I think the film really delivers in a way that is almost surprising. It's a wildly enthusiastic film, a movie that works because it is in love with the original series and the potential that is inherent to "put a team together and save the world" scenario.

Paula Patton is a badass. Who knew? I've seen her in various films and she's always struck me as very attractive but underused. Here, she is very effective because you buy the physical side of her in the action scenes. She is credible, and that's important. Cruise does so much of his work in these movies in physical terms that he needs people around him who are equally physical, and Patton lives up to the challenge.

Robert Elswit's photography is crazy-sleek, and Paul Hirsch has a sure and steady hand as an editor. If you enjoy this movie, you've got to credit them with a big part of why. Bird really does have an amazing support system on this film, and it feels like he worked hard to justify having guys like that on the payroll. If you're going to hire Robert Elswit, you have to give him something worth shooting, and Bird's got a really dynamic sense of composition and motion.

Mainly, though, it's just nice to see the Bad Robot voice collide with Brad Bird's voice and result in something that embodies the best of both. There's no doubt that this is a sequel to the last film, and it seems like the real goal of the film is to build a team that can last more than one movie. It's nice to see the way these characters reveal themselves and build connections, and Cruise seems more than happy to make room for Renner and Patton and Pegg. He's entertained by them, and they all make real contributions to the film. It's so easy when you've got a star as big as Cruise for that person to overwhelm the movie, but Bird never lets that happen. I was surprised and pleased by the way they bring back even the idea of Julia, Cruise's wife-to-be in the last movie. I also really like the way it feels like the main point of the film is to let Brad Bird beat the holy hell out of Tom Cruise in scene after scene, heaping the abuse on him. It is not a film of great depth, and it doesn't have the same rich subtext as movies like "The Iron Giant," "The Incredibles," or "Ratatouille," but it's not trying to be any of those movies. Bird's proven here that he can orchestrate mayhem with grace and style, and that he can absolutely adapt his voice to someone else's creation, and while that might not make this one of the very best films of the year, it does make it a significant one, because I get the feeling Bird's still just warming up.

And if you're curious about the "Dark Knight Rises" prologue that will be attached to this in its large-format IMAX bookings, you may want to check back here on Friday morning for more about that. Hint, hint.
http://www.hitfix.com/blogs/motion-captured/posts/review-tom-cruise-leads-the-best-team-yet-in-sensational-mission-impossible-ghost-protocol


A Few More Reviews: Crave and Variety:
http://www.craveonline.com/film/reviews/179347-review-mission-impossible-ghost-protocol
http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117946718/
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Re: Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Postby DarthLocke on Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:53 pm

Mission Impossible 5 - Already In Talks!
Spoiler (Click to reveal/hide)
Brad Bird’s Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol (affectionately known as Ghotocol around the CinemaBlend offices) is off to a rip-roaring start. With 161 reviews filed, the sequel boasts a robust 93% Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes , and has earned an estimated $26 million domestically since opening on IMAX screens on Dec. 16. Without giving away any spoilers, the end suggests that more stories easily could be told. Now we’re hearing they might be told sooner rather than later.

Sources at Skydance, one of the production companies behind Tom Cruise’s latest spy thriller, are telling Moviehole that Paramount’s eager to push ahead with a fifth Mission: Impossible feature, as well as a new top Gun. And they want to get them in the pipeline quickly.

Well, they’d kind of have to. As I mentioned in a few Ghotocol stories, the 49-year-old Cruise looks like a 30-year-old kid bouncing off the side of the Burj Khalifa and racing through a sandstorm in pursuit of nuclear codes. But how much longer can he wait to slip back into the role of Ethan Hunt? And while the franchise has done a decent job of slipping in Jeremy Renner as a possible substitute, I think Ghotocol re-establishes this as Cruise’s franchise, and I’m not sure a fifth Mission would do well with another actor playing a different spy. That would be like Die Hard without Bruce Willis (a franchise that, coincidentally, is racing the clock to get a fifth installment in before its lead files for AARP).

Now, who will direct? Could Bird become the first director in the franchise to return for a second adventure? Moviehole has quotes from Bird about possibly bringing Leonard Nimoy back into the M:I fold (he starred in 49 episodes of the original series), but all of this is tentative. I know that I’d certainly love to see Bird take another shot, as Ghotocol was so much fun. But these sequels tend to reflect the vision of their directors, and a fresh voice might be appreciated, as well.
http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Mission-Impossible-5-Talks-Already-Underway-28516.html


I put this in Spoiler Tags in case it gets moved to the non spoiler section since MI:GP has officially opened.
Image
Image

Yet for all their evolution, they form no bonds.
Love does not exist for them. They are incapable of dreaming,
Of contemplating beauty, Of knowing something greater than themselves.
User avatar
DarthLocke
Show Expert
 
Posts: 7904
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:33 pm
Location: The Swan of Island's Past.
Gender: Female

Previous

Return to Movies - Spoilers


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

cron